Timeshare and destination clubs are a form of property ownership involving ownership of an individual unit of accommodation for seasonal usage.

A motel is a small-sized low-rise lodging with direct access to individual rooms from the car park.

Some hotels are built specifically as a destination in itself, for example at casinos and holiday resorts.

Most hotel establishments are run by a General Manager who serves as the head executive (often referred to as the "Hotel Manager"), department heads who oversee various departments within a hotel (e.g., food service), middle managers, administrative staff, and line-level supervisors.

Famous London examples of inns include the George and the Tabard.

A typical layout of an inn had an inner court with bedrooms on the two sides, with the kitchen and parlour at the front and the stables at the back.

The organizational chart and volume of job positions and hierarchy varies by hotel size, function and class, and is often determined by hotel ownership and managing companies.

The word hotel is derived from the French hôtel (coming from the same origin as hospital), which referred to a French version of a building seeing frequent visitors, and providing care, rather than a place offering accommodation.

Economy hotels are small to medium-sized hotel establishments that offer basic accommodations with little to no services.

Extended stay hotels are small to medium-sized hotels that offer longer-term full service accommodations compared to a traditional hotel.

For a period of about 200 years from the mid-17th century, coaching inns served as a place for lodging for coach travelers (in other words, a roadhouse).

Coaching inns stabled teams of horses for stagecoaches and mail coaches and replaced tired teams with fresh teams.

An upscale full-service hotel facility offers luxury amenities, full service accommodations, an on-site restaurant, and the highest level of personalized service, such as a concierge, room service and clothes pressing staff.